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Beats headphones battery explodes and Apple claims: “Its not our fault”

A pair of Beats headphones explode on a flight, burning the passenger and endangering the rest of the passengers. Apple claims

Beats by Dre Twitter

A pair of Beats headphones explode on a flight, burning the passenger and endangering the rest of the passengers. Apple claims "its not our fault" due to it being an older version. It has been advised to check if passengers' devices are safe for flight before boarding the plane from here forward.

Micheal Everman and Paola Espinosa

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A pair of Beats headphones exploded on a flight, burning an onboard passenger and endangering the rest. Beats was bought by Apple in 2014, making Apple responsible for the production and any incidents within the brand. Apple blames the “third party (AAA) batteries” for the explosion on the flight, making no further claim on the topic.

Wikimedia Commons
Apple bought beats for three billion dollars, making it the largest purchase Apple has made to date.

The incident happened on Friday, February 19th, on a flight from Beijing, China to Melbourne, Australia. The passenger, who remains anonymous, awoke from her nap to a large explosion, she commented, “As I went to turn around I felt burning on my face,” she told Australian Transport Safety Bureau. She threw the headphones on the floor where flight attendants rushed to flush the headphones with water.

“As I went to turn around, I felt burning on my face,””

— Female passenger

The headphones were most likely an older pair made by Beats due to the fact that the headphones used AAA batteries, making that another excuse why Apple is not at fault for the explosion. The female passenger had singed hair, burns on her face, neck, and hands. After the explosion, the headphones continued to burn so she proceeded to throw the Beats on ground. As soon as the headphones began to melt the cabin floor, the flight attendants had to get involved.

“They put them into the bucket at the rear end of the plane, with the combination of melted plastic and small pieces of burnt hair,” she added, the bucket spread an unpleasant smell throughout the plane and the other passengers felt very uncomfortable and many passengers were found choking and coughing all the way home. After the eventful flight, The Air Transportation Stabilization Board, announced that, “we have to be more careful with our battery powered devices, especially on planes.” Flights now request that before boarding a plane, passengers check for the UL logo on the device that indicates if the hardware has been certified by the global safety company.

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Beats headphones battery explodes and Apple claims: “Its not our fault”