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The Abandoned LA Zoo remains in ruins but continues to be popular among LA residents

The+cages+of+the+Abandoned+LA+Zoo+have+turned+into+the+canvas+for+street+artists%2C+adding+life+to+what+is+now+decaying.+Residents+of+the+Los+Angeles+area+%28and+most+of+southern+California%29+visit+the+old+zoo+to+explore+the+ruins+of+what+is+left.+The+zoo+was+closed+in+1966+but+it+has+since+been+opened+to+the+public.
The cages of the Abandoned LA Zoo have turned into the canvas for street artists, adding life to what is now decaying. Residents of the Los Angeles area (and most of southern California) visit the old zoo to explore the ruins of what is left. The zoo was closed in 1966 but it has since been opened to the public.

The cages of the Abandoned LA Zoo have turned into the canvas for street artists, adding life to what is now decaying. Residents of the Los Angeles area (and most of southern California) visit the old zoo to explore the ruins of what is left. The zoo was closed in 1966 but it has since been opened to the public.

Johnny Palavecino

Johnny Palavecino

The cages of the Abandoned LA Zoo have turned into the canvas for street artists, adding life to what is now decaying. Residents of the Los Angeles area (and most of southern California) visit the old zoo to explore the ruins of what is left. The zoo was closed in 1966 but it has since been opened to the public.

Kaitlyn Valenzuela, Reporter

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Griffith Park is home to an abundance of attractions, some of which include: the Griffith Observatory, the Greek Amphitheatre, the (current) Los Angeles Zoo, the Travel Town train museum, and the iconic Hollywood Sign. However, the large park also has its most eerie attraction yet, the Abandoned LA Zoo. Those who enjoy adventure go to explore the disused cages or roam around the ruined land.

The zoo first opened in 1912 with only fifteen animals in which most were donated by film producer, William Nicholas Selig, from his production studios. As time went on, the zoo was being criticized for its unappealing appearance, despite attracting nearly two million visitors a year. By 1958, the city passed an $8 million dollar bond to build a brand new zoo.

The zoo was nearly shutdown in 1916 by the Health Department when they found out the repellent sewage was draining into the LA River. Due to a short budget, the zoo found difficulty when trying to resolve the sewage issue and an even bigger issue with an inadequate amount to build new and proper cages. Questioning of the animals’ well-being began to pop up among the concerned who visited the malnourished zoo.

Unfortunately, the Griffith Park Zoo did not last for long and closed down its doors August of 1966. The animals were then transferred to the new and improved Los Angeles Zoo, two miles away, which opened in November 1966. The empty cages that was once a home to wildlife, were left as ruins.

Today, the old LA Zoo is now a trendy location for Los Angeles residents as it offers a suitable hiking trail and picnic tables — a wonderful setting for adventure. With its rocky architecture and rusty cages, people are free to enter and observe the inside of the cages first hand. It is one of the few historical places in Los Angeles where there are only a limited number of restrictions, making it an exciting experience for all to appreciate.

It has also become the canvas for street artists as the inside of the cages are coated in colorful graffiti art which contributes to the aesthetic the zoo beholds. Photographers visit the estranged location as well due to the numerous of excellent photographic settings there are. And because it is Hollywood, plenty of filming for movies and TV shows has been done on the particular site.

But if the zoo is abandoned and left in ruins, then why doesn’t anyone do something about it? Well miraculously, the cages and the rest of the broken-down structures of the property have been preserved. The worn out zoo is apart of the popular Griffith Park which is owned by the city, meaning it is open to the public and has been converted into a picnic area for visitors to utilize.

Such outdoor dining area is accompanied by empty animal cages that are on display. There are even tables arranged inside such exhibits. A unique place to have a picnic!

Urban explorers remain thrilled at the preservation of the old Griffith Park Zoo, the animal sanctuary that now serves as a tourist attraction. The location is seen with a poetic eye; with its rusty iron bars within the cages, followed by the artistic value of graffiti. It is perhaps more appreciated because of its  decay rather than the history that lies beneath.

Christina Chou, a writer for UntappedCties.com who explored the old LA Zoo for herself, states, “[it is] the ironic preservation of a poorly designed zoo in a state of decay.” It is only a recreational area of a past era but is adored by daring individuals. However, the hidden parts of the zoo with the most striking personality are targeted the most due to the excitement it brings to the city’s dwellers.

The Abandoned LA Zoo is not well advertised nor heavily populated but is still apart of the City of Angels. The mysterious sensation that lingers throughout such space echoes against its rock walls and iron bars. It is the secret refuge of southern California residents who desire a prosperous adventure filled with crumbling remains and old memories.

 

 

 

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"WE HEAR YOU!"
The Abandoned LA Zoo remains in ruins but continues to be popular among LA residents